Friday, February 17, 2012

Smores Challah

I've talked before about how much The Hazz and I hate corn syrup and artificial dyes.  However, I also recently ate my words with the recent blue-dyed Parting of the Sea Challah. So we figured it wouldn't hurt us that much if we had a little marshmallow fluff in our lives.

That's right, marshmallow fluff. After we made this challah, I told my friends about how we had made it. That launched into fond childhood memories of fluffernutters, marshmallow fluff on graham crackers, cookies... and spoons.

Okay, I seriously just stopped writing this post to have a spoonful. It's that good.

Alright, back to the post. First, we divided our dough into three. We used a method modified from our Nutella Challah. I first created short logs and then rolled them out flat with a rolling pin.
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Then, we took our marshmallow fluff, and our chocolate chips, and our graham crackers. We crumbled up the grahams and mixed them together with the chocolate chips. Then It's important to do this step before you do the fluff because the fluff sort of relaxes once it's out of the jar and becomes slightly liquify.

Next spread the marshmallow fluff liberally on the dough with the back of the spoon or a knife. The picture below shows a little bit of graham and chocolate. Seriously not enough. We put like three times that amount on.
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Once you've topped all of your strands, bring them together like a canoli.
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Pinch the strands. Try to do this with clean hands. It helps to have a partner who hasn't covered their hands in delicious marshmallow fluff. :)

Braid carefully. We only did like three or four overs. When you're braiding, try to fold the seams down so their inside the loaf. Let rest for about 20 minutes. Egg wash and sprinkle with finely crumbled graham crackers.
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I highly recommend baking this challah on parchment paper. We were lucky and had very little breaking open of the seams, but it will help with clean up.  Bake at 350 for about a half hour.  Press the seams to make sure they seem baked through.
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The result.  WOW!  I tried it when it was warmish, and it was pretty much like a campfire.  The Hazz even commented it smelled like s'mores while the challah was baking.

It's a little bit silly.  I mean, could we really serve this at a Shabbat dinner?  Probably not.  But, man oh man was it a great breakfast on Shabbat morning.
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What about you?  Have you made any ridiculous challot that turned about AMAZING?  This one is definitely it.

3 comments:

  1. We were invited to attend a Scout Shabbat, and I cannot think of a more perfect challah to bring for a bunch of scouts than this! It i s mid-rise as I type :) love your bog, keep up the good work!!

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    1. Yay! Love to hear this. My husband made a few experimental ones this week (!), so we'll hopefully have some more sweet challot coming soon. Shabbat Shalom!

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